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  #1  
Old 06-14-2006, 01:10 PM
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Arrow Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel - Regs & Discussion

The following links contain some excellent info concerning the ULSD (Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel) that becomes mandatory this October 15th.

Heavy-Duty Highway Diesel Program EPA document.

What is Clean Diesel Fuel? DieselForum.org document.

ULSD FAQ Clean-Diesel.org Frequently Asked Questions.
According the Clean-Diesel.org, the mandated ULSD will receive lubricity and corrosion additives prior to its distribution and retail sale, which is said to produce fuel qualities equal to what we have available now.

Last edited by More Power; 06-15-2006 at 09:11 PM.
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Old 07-31-2006, 12:24 PM
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Until the new ULSD refining and distribution have been established and all the bugs worked out, I'm recommending everyone begin using some sort of fuel treatment to counter the effects of lower lubricity.

I heard last month from a Page member in Michigan who installed a brand new DB2 fuel injection pump, filled his motorhome with ULSD, drove 150 miles, then experienced a pump seizure. Stanadyne denied the warranty, claiming a lack of lubricity....

It appears that to meet the 15 ppm sulfur requirement, some refineries are actually removing all of the sulfur (or as close to it as possible), expecting some residual contamination from the distribution system. There are fuel lubricity requirements (ISO 12156-1, -2, ASTM D-6079), which are met by adding a lubricity treatment. It requires faith, to put all your trust in the refineries....

I suspect all this will eventually be worked out. Till then, and to be cautious, we recommend ULSD fuel be treated. Many different nationally available diesel fuel treatments offer lubricity ingredients. Stanadyne (for example) reports that adding their "Performance Formula" fuel treatment at the recommended ratio will provide adequate fuel lubricity for ULSD.

If you can buy bio-diesel (even B1), that would be a solution. Bio naturally adds lubricity.

Jim
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Old 08-07-2006, 06:59 PM
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You can also consider adding two-stroke oil. It is DESIGNED to be burned without leaving ash and fouling, and is STUFFED with lubricity additives. I use TC-W3 oil at a rate of about 1 part per thousand, or 2 ounces per 16 gallons of fuel.

Gee, I guess that is also one ounce per 8 gallons of fuel, for those who can't do mental math without a calculator.
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Old 08-09-2006, 02:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CleviteKid

Gee, I guess that is also one ounce per 8 gallons of fuel, for those who can't do mental math without a calculator.
Should you check that math with the good DR?
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Old 08-22-2006, 12:31 PM
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According to clean-diesel.org I've been using ULSD since June 1, 2006. How come non of the pumps I fill up at in California have a sticker telling me so? Or has the transition not taken place yet? Anyone in California know? I'm not concerned just curios. Thanks


Quote:
Q. How will I know which pump is dispensing ULSD fuel?

A. Federal regulations require the labeling of all diesel fuel pumps to specify the type of fuel dispensed by each pump (except in California where all diesel fuel must be ULSD by June 1, 2006). Similar instrument panel and fuel inlet/fill cap labeling is being mandated for 2007 and later model year engines and vehicles that require ULSD fuel. Consumers are advised to check the pump labels and vehicle labels to ensure they are refueling with the proper diesel fuel consistent with their vehicle warranties.
Found an answer shortly after posting:
according to chevron.com

Quote:
California

On-Highway, Off-Road, & Fixed Equipment Diesel Fuel
Refinery < 15ppm by June 1, 2006
Terminal < 15ppm by July 15, 2006
Retail < 15ppm by September 1, 2006
Intra-State Locomotive / Marine Harbor Craft Fuel < 15ppm by January 1, 2007
I've still got a few days left.
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Old 08-22-2006, 01:12 PM
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Here's the fuel pump label. Provided by JK..

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Old 08-30-2006, 11:23 AM
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The new 2007 diesel engines, with the new oxidation catalyst and DPF (Diesel Particulate Filters), must use the newly formulated "Low Ash" motor oil. Shell offers the new API spec CJ-4 rated motor for the new diesel engines that meets the low ash requirements. Ash deposits from earlier oils could plug the catalyst and DPF. Shell (and I suspect other traditional diesel rated motor oil manufacturers) will have the shelves stocked around the country with the new CJ-4 motor oil by October 15th.

Any fuel treatment used in the 2007 vehicles must also meet the low ash requirements, which rules out using motor oils, ATF or 2-cycle oils as a fuel treatment in the 2007 diesels. This wouldn't apply to 2006 or earlier model year vehicles, though motor oil and ATF are dismissed as beneficial fuel treatments by the fuel injection system industry.

The fuel treatment brands Stanadyne and Power Service meet the requirements for the 2007 emissions systems. Other brands may also, but I haven't heard from them yet. If you buy a 2007 model year diesel and want to use a fuel treatment not mentioned here, find out whether it meets the new EPA & emissions system specs before using it.

Jim

Last edited by More Power; 08-31-2006 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 08-30-2006, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by More Power
The fuel treatment brands Stanadyne and Power Service meet the requirements for the 2007 emissions systems.
Jim
Jim, I was having trouble getting the Stanadyne Total Performance (Blue Label) from the local diesel shop. They are telling me that they have 15 cases on back order because Standyne has not gotten their numbers (Lubricity) in the range that they want for the ULSD. I was able to get some off of the Camping World website, but I'm wondering now if this stuff I just bought is gonna be enough to offset the loss of lubricity in the new fuel. I also get fuel at a station that is a county co-op that refines their own diesel, and they state on the pump that it is 10% bio. In your opinion, will this 10% bio and the old formula Standyne offset the lack of lubricity in the ULSD?
JP
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Old 08-30-2006, 11:43 PM
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HH,

The refineries are required to treat the ULSD to maintain the lubricity and corrosion protection offered by LSD. Whether they do or not is the question. I'm hearing that the refineries are actually attempting to remove all of the sulfur from the fuel, expecting some residual contamination from the distribution system. This lowers lubricity even further. The fines to the refineries for not meeting the targeted sulfur levels are onerous. I think in the long run, it'll all be sorted out, and we won't need to worry. It's the short term switch-over period that we may need to be concerned about.

Stanadyne told me that treating the fuel at the recommended ratio should restore ULSD to LSD lubricity levels even without additional refinery treatment. They went further, saying that a Performance Formula treatment ratio at 2x would provide added insurance (and increase sales of treatment....).

I'm told 1% bio will add 65% of the lost lubricity, so a 2% bio-diesel (B2) would add back all we need. Additionally, I'm hearing that some ULSD diesel fuel distributors in MN are actually using bio as the lubricity treatment....

Here's what Power Service sent to me in response to my request for info about their fuel treatment and diesel fuel lubricity....

Quote:
There have been many changes in the last few years to the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) D975 standard for diesel fuel. In January 2005 a new fuel lubricity standard ASTM D6079 was established for diesel fuel. This is a test method for evaluating lubricity of diesel fuel as measured by the HFRR (High Frequency Reciprocating Rig) Test with a wear scar not to exceed 520 microns. In all likelihood lubricity will be added at the refinery. Because this test is not precise there is an acceptable variance from 520 to 570 micron. Since it is more expensive to get the fuel down to the 520 micron wear scar most fuels will probably be closer to the 570. Lubricity is also more crucial for the smaller pickups and small cars than the big rigs. According to a study conducted by BOSCH ,which includes the interest of Stanadyne, Siemens, Denso and Delphi, the new standard for light duty fuel injection equipment is not even borderline. They are saying that the fuel needs to be at least 460 micron and they really want, but will not get, a HFRR 380 micron. In their study they say that for DFIE (diesel fuel injection equipment) fuel lubricity is the most valuable and crucial property and that Common-rail and Rotary pumps require the same level of lubricity. It should also be pointed out that injectors also benefit from better fuel lubricity. DFS, Diesel Kleen and Diesel 911 will get the lubricity of the fuel below the HFRR 520 and provide excellent fuel pump protection.

For the fuel pumps in diesel vehicles the fuel is the lubricating agent. If the fuel does not have adequate lubricity the fuel pumps will wear faster and can end in damage and pump failure. Power Service has several products that provide excellent lubricity protection and are labeled with the SlickDiesel logo. Diesel Fuel Supplement (DFS), Diesel Kleen and Diesel 911 all contain this excellent lubricity package. Diesel Fuel Supplement is the Number 1 selling diesel fuel additive in the USA. It is the best product to use for winter and it contains detergents to keep injectors from getting dirty, Cetane Boost to help with faster and easier engine starts, reduced emissions and white smoke, lessens engine noise and aids in faster engine warm-up. DFS contains SlickDiesel for excellent lubricity protection. When using the quart and 96-ounce containers a single treat is 1-ounce to each 3-gallons of fuel. If you add 25 gallons to your fuel tank then you would add 9-ounces of DFS (25 divided by 3 equals 8.3 [round fractions up to the next whole number] or 9-ounces of DFS). To add a double treat then just double this number or add 18-ounces. Diesel Kleen is the best non-winter product that you can use and is the Number 2 selling diesel fuel additive in the USA. Diesel Kleen does not have an antigel so it contains more detergents and more Cetane Boost than DFS. The detergents are strong enough to clean up dirty injectors within the spray pattern range of a new injector. Diesel Kleen will give even better fuel economy and will pay for itself when used with every fillup. Diesel Kleen has a better stability package, will increase the Cetane Boost of the fuel even better than DFS and also contains SlickDiesel. Both products will also help control condensation. The treat rate for Diesel Kleen in the quart and 96-ounce containers are the same as for DFS. Diesel 911 is the third best selling diesel fuel additive in the USA and it also contains SlickDiesel. Diesel 911 is intended to be used to get people out of trouble especially during the winter. Free water causes about one-third of all fuel flow problems in the winter. Diesel 911 does not contain an antigel but it will disperse water and help prevent water related problems in both summer and winter. Use Diesel 911 just before winter to disperse water caused by condensation and to prevent fuel filter icing when the first cold spell hits. Use 1 gallon to each 200 gallons of fuel or 1-ounce to each 1.5 gallons of fuel to pre-treat fuel tanks. Diesel 911 can also be used to de-ice frozen fuel filters and help to reliquefy gelled diesel fuel in big rigs. Diesel 911 also contains SlickDiesel.

DFS and Diesel Kleen are made to be used with every fillup and will solve most of the problems associated with diesel fuel. When you use these with every fillup your equipment will work better, last longer and have fewer repairs. The increase in fuel economy alone will pay for the additive and the other benefits are the icing on the cake.

I hope this answers some of your questions about our products and lubricity issues with the new Ultra Low Diesel Fuels coming on the market. Let me know if you have any other questions or concerns.

Best regards,

Power Service Products, Inc.
I should add that GM only recommends a water-demulsifying fuel treatment. PS is a water-emulsifying treatment.... There are pros and cons for each, and some opinions have been stated here in this board. If I had to make a recommendation, it would be to err on the side of warranty protection and follow GM's advice - though after 20 years of driving a GM diesel pickup, I've yet to hear of a warranty dispute arising from using a fuel treatment.

Jim

Last edited by More Power; 08-30-2006 at 11:54 PM.
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  #10  
Old 08-31-2006, 08:36 PM
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Thanks Jim, sounds like I'm covered with the 10% bio, and Camping World had the Stanadyne Performance Formula in stock, and I am now the proud owner of 17 bottles.... So with that and the Bio I'm not gonna sweat it. Again thanks for the info, good reading.
JP
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2004 Suburban 2500 LT 6.0L 4x4, Bilstein Shocks, Federico front/rear sway bars
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